Who Says You Can’t Teach An Old Dog New Tricks?


To quote the rock band Chicago, they say it’s a hard habit to break. Perpetually stereotyping employment, marriage, and singularity: Age is but a hindrance but not for long. With approximately 15 minutes of training daily for 2 weeks straight, according to The Animal Planet, even the most stubborn dogs will give in. These enduring canines will sit, roll over, and do whatever your heart desires. All you need is a strong sense of consistency, and a mouthful of patience under your sleeve.

Who Says You Can't Teach An Old Dog New Tricks?In order to make this a quick fix, the trainers (or owners) should develop a positive attitude. To feel frustrated and angry will not help at all. As a matter of fact, pets somehow feel how their owners experience; and that would not speed up the progress for even a bit. As for the owner’s side, unreasonable expectations should not be made for their pets. Unlike children sent to school for a 12-year formal education to get the basics, it is quite irrational to invest an uptight 12-week course for your dog to acquire the desired behavior, and earn the respect and discipline needed. Remember: all relationships require a bit of work.

It also involves recognizing the dog’s previous training, then deciding on what certain applicable and viable changes are needed for a greater effect. You highlight the dog after a day’s work with plenty of rewards such as treats, and verbal praises such as patting him on the head for doing a good job. Take it nice and easy, as not to shock and confuse the pet. It is necessary to change the behavior in small steps rather than a complete change all at one time.

However, there is a difference. One has to put in mind that training an older dog is remembering that this dog has, most expected, to having been trained once. This means that it has an established thinking as to what acceptable behaviors are, and what behaviors are most not welcomed. It takes a great deal of endurance to train an older dog, and should be at the very least regular to receive the best outcome.

But do keep in mind that although the owner is the master, the dog still is an individual, as in it has its own personality; so a little give-and-take affiliation will not hurt. The key is to enjoy the whole teaching-an-old-dog-new-tricks activity, as you build a better relationship with him. That is the sole purpose of dog obedience training.

What you give is what you get; therefore being the educator, you are responsible for the way your pet responds. Dogs are social creatures, and are among of the most loyal. If you have a senior dog around who needs a bit of a push, do not fret; all you need is give your little furry friend some feisty
motivation. Who ever said you can’t teach old dogs new tricks?

That saying is meant to be taken more literally to humans, for we’ve got a lot of habits that are harder to break.